Over the last few modules you have already begun to practise journaling using the set activities you’ve already completed. You may still feel a bit unsure about how to use journalling on a regular basis to support you to ease anxiety and regulate emotions in lots of different situations.  This activity is going to help you develop some essential tricks to allow you to use journalling in a really adaptable way so you have this essential tool at your fingertips any time you need.

They say that repetition is the only form of permanence which I know, doesn’t sound fun or exciting but this is how to maintain the positive benefits you are working to achieve from this course and that is where the biggest rewards are found. Maintaining your wellbeing is about doing little and often and this is especially true when your cultivating new habits so let’s continue to build on this as you master journaling for self-regulation and helping to calm and soothe yourself when anxiety could begin to build.

Over the next week or two, I want you to use journaling to get out and process any resentment, anger, fear, sadness and other emotions you may be experiencing, so you can get clear on how you are feeling and what is creating the distress. If you’re not sure where to start use the following sentence starters as a prompt. Using these sentence starters can help you articulate and externalise your feelings and emotions, making it easier to explore and understand them through writing or conversation.

  • Right now I’m feeling…
  • I’m resentful at… because…
  • I’m angry at… because…
  • I’m fearful of…because…
  • One thing on my mind is… and it causes me to feel…
  • In this moment, I’m overwhelmed by…
  • I can’t shake the feeling that…
  • I’m sensing heaviness/anxiety/uneasiness because…
  • I’m noticing a recurring feeling of…

 

  1. Do a minimum of 10 minutes per day, more if you get in the flow of it.
  2. Choose at least one sentence starter and write as much or as little as you want. Try not to overthink this. The only wrong way to do it, is not to do it.
  3. Let the words flow out of your pen in any scribbly form you want. The important thing is the process of writing, and the experience of letting these feelings flow out.
  4. You are not writing this for anyone but yourself so it can be as imperfect as you want. I like to grab scrap paper, a used envelope or old printer paper and write on the back of it. This helps to release the pressure of having to do my writing perfectly so I can engage in the feeling of just writing and letting go of whatever is bothering me.
  5. Finish by writing 3 things you are grateful for.